Green Hedge Manor (circa 1872*)

aka: Thomas Judd Home

(See history at bottom of page)

 

Lela Suite
Kaelis Room
Paisley Room

 

Living Room & Kitchen

Living Room with hide-a-bed & Kitchen area with refrigerator/freezer, oven, range, microwave & dishwasher.

 Enjoy friends and family in this comfortable living room and (modern) kitchen.

To Lela Suite
To Kaelis Room
To Paisley Room

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Lela Suite

King Bed, Whirlpool Tub, Television

 Enjoy your own personal fireplace inside this elegant bedroom.


 

 Relax in comfort including this whirlpool tub.

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Back to Sitting Room & Kitchen
 

To Paisley Room

Kaelis Room

Queen Bed, Private Bathroom

 Fine touches are widely spread throughout this room.

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Back to Sitting Room & Kitchen
Back to Lela Suite
 


Paisley Room

Queen Bed, Private Bathroom

 Find rest and restoration on this large queen bed.

 

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Back to Sitting Room & Kitchen

Back to Lela Suite


Back to Kaelis Room

Green Gate Village Historic Inn

76 West Tabernacle

St. George, Utah 84770

800-350-6999

stay@greengatevillageinn.com

History:

This beautiful home is so named because of the tall tamarack hedge that surrounded most of the city block where the home was originally built at 269 S. 200 East Street around 1872*.  Under the hedge was found an ornate fence and gates of carefully turned balusters and spindles.  According to recent documents provided by Kathleen Hardy Pulsipher, this fence was manufactured by George William Hardy at his family mill located at 580 E. 100 North Street.  (100 North Street was later to be renamed St. George Blvd.)  Portions of this original fence and gates, along with a picture of Hardy's old mill, are on display at the Green Gate Village Inn.  

Homes in the area usually took two, three or even four or more years to complete as the owners were often  farmers and business men who had more pressing duties in order to provide for the daily needs of their growing families.  While the "Green Hedge Manor" may have been started, or initially built of locally manufactured adobe bricks in 1872, it is now clear from the carefully written journal of George Kirkham, that both he (George) and Judd's brother Joseph Judd, both master carpenters, were hard at work on this home during November of 1874, while awaiting lumber from the Mt. Trumbull sawmill so that they could resume their work on the St. George LDS temple which was also under construction just two blocks to the south of this home.  Since George remarks in his journal that they could hear the stone workers at the temple, George and Joseph were probably working on the ornate trim on the outside of the Thomas Judd home at that time.

Thomas Judd was 18 years old in 1864 when he joined the LDS church and moved with his family from England to St. George. Hard working and successful in his business endeavors, he looked to expand his business interests and was alarmed that frequent flooding was washing away valuable river-bottom farm land.  In 1888, he developed a plan to divert water from the Virgin River onto the LaVerkin "bench" in order to irrigate several hundred acres of fruit orchards that he planned to plant there. Because of extensive delays due to constant breaks in the canal he was eventually forced to mortgage this very house in order to raise the necessary funds to complete construction of his canal, which by then stretched several thousand feet and included an 840-foot long tunnel. Eventually his canal project was the key factor in establishing the community of LaVerkin.

In 1897, Thomas Judd was called by Wilford Woodruff, then president of the LDS Church, to serve a mission colonizing Whitewater, Nevada. By the time he returned home, the railroad had extended far enough south that he was able to import hundreds of bags of Portland cement to coat the inside walls of his canal in order to minimize breaks and leakage and, thus, better assure its success. He subsequently sold much of his interest in LaVerkin, including the local hot springs.  Some years later (circa 1911) he opened Thomas Judd's Store Company, at 62 West Tabernacle Street.  That little general store remains in operation still today.

In 1991, long after Thomas Judd's death, this original family home was dismantled to make way for condominiums.  The home was stored on a vacant lot for several years.  Eventually it was moved, piece-by-piece, to the Green Gate Village, circa 1995, where it was rebuilt to the original specifications and carefully restored and modernized. (During the reconstruction, the living room and master bedroom fireplaces were inadvertently switched.)  The Green Hedge Manor contains two upstairs guestrooms as well as one of the most popular bridal suites at the Village. This home is on the National Register of Historic Places (#78002710).

copyright 2014 Historic Village Properties, LLC